Lillian Learns the Hard Way

(16 customer reviews)

$4.99

Sample Chapter

Lillian Charteris has a head for business, and has spent years working alongside her father, Alexander, preparing to take over the family’s real estate enterprise, Charteris Inc. When her father dies suddenly, Lillian knows that she is ready. Her formidable talents are impossible to ignore.

But neither she nor her family are prepared for the reading of the will. When it leaves Lillian staggering with the knowledge that she isn’t inheriting Charteris Inc., she defiantly contests the new heir apparent, Johnny Gordons-Lamond.

Young and affluent, Johnny has continued to make his family’s business prosper at his hands, and intends to do the same with Charteris Inc. He knows what it takes to run a successful enterprise – and can see that Lillian could help him do so, if she could only be made to see so herself. Can he contend with Lillian’s fiery temper? Or will he need to take her in hand and across his knee?
Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Lillian-Learns-Hard-Georgia-Harries-ebook/dp/B0101BQFLA/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1435064227&sr=8-1&keywords=lillian+learns+the+hard+way
Bn: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/lillian-learns-the-hard-way-georgia-harries/1056097290?ean=2940151109468

Sample Chapter

Turning away from the throng of mourners passing slowly through Trinity Cemetery gates, Lillian Charteris pulled her dark silk shawl tight around her shoulders. The day was bitterly cold and an unpleasant drizzle was beginning to fall, dampening her long blonde curls. The funeral had unfolded without Lillian showing the slightest hint of emotion. And she remained determined to keep it so. As her late father’s eldest daughter, she saw it now as her ultimate duty to remain as strong as she could. She knew that was what he would have wanted, after all. His family, friends, and colleagues had all been impressed with her composure throughout the lengthy service. But it was nothing less than they would have expected of the remarkable young Miss Charteris.

Retying the laces of her velveteen bonnet under her dainty chin as she shivered in the cold late autumn air, Lillian nodded a cool thank you to the final mourners to leave the cemetery, and walked hurriedly to join her mother and twin sisters in the black lacquered hansom cab. New York was bleak and unforgiving on this saddest day, and she felt waves of exhaustion overcome her.

"Straight back to the Mansions please, Jacks. We have many guests awaiting us and I should like them to depart early this evening," Lillian instructed their driver, who had worked for the family since she was a little girl.

Raising his eyebrows, Jacks wondered what it would take to bring out a shred of sympathy in the girl. She had a will of steel, even on the day of her father’s funeral.

In the back of the cab, Dorothea Charteris sat dabbing her eyes with the edge of a fine cotton handkerchief. As her eldest daughter sat down beside her, opposite her younger twin daughters, at last she sobbed.

"Oh, my dears! I really did not think I should survive that service. Whatever are we to do? I fear I shall never recover from the loss of your dear, dear Papa."

The sixteen-year-old twins, Grace and Sylvie, resumed the sorry tears they had been shedding for the past week since Papa had been found dead in his study. It was Holmes, the butler, who had made the grim discovery of his employer of twenty years lying cold across his desk. Aged only fifty, a massive heart attack had taken Alexander Charteris in the blink of an eye. His widow and daughters sought the only comfort they could from the fact that Doctor Neville insisted he would have had scant awareness, and passed away quickly.

Allowing her younger sisters a moment to compose themselves, Lillian took her mother’s arm and breathed a heavy sigh. "Come now, Mama. Girls. We are blessed to have had such a beautiful remembrance for Papa. We are fortunate most of all to have the means with which to lay him to rest here in peace, in one of America’s most resplendent cemeteries. He shall have the most ornate monument that we can buy, and we shall visit it every Sunday. We are desperately lucky by comparison to many. Think of the poorest youngsters of our fair city. Living in daily squalor, many fending for themselves. Let us be grateful."

Dorothea squeezed her arm, and sniffed. Lillian was so like her father, she remarked to herself. A broad-minded egalitarian. A generous, thoughtful girl. But, also like her father, often too quick to act. Dorothea worried that she was brushing his death under the carpet all too soon. The pretty twins looked at one another, ever each other’s solace, as Jacks sped off towards Broadway.

Although still a young woman, Lillian Charteris was renowned for her robust, practical approach to life. At twenty, she had all but garnered her place as the head of household, even while Alexander Charteris had been alive and well, with his New York real estate business expanding rapidly by the day. Since gaining a diploma in bookkeeping and administration at the prestigious Morgan-Leonard Ladies’ College in Boston, she had spent the last year working closely with Alexander in studying the mechanics of business. She had become au fait with running of the large, moneymaking enterprise, and was keen to put her skills to the test.

Her mother, sisters and girlfriends had watched with some alarm, and then a grudging admiration, as Lillian began to show more interest in ledgers and auditing than she ever did in choosing gowns or domestic matters. She had been about to embark on a semi-formal position as her father’s personal assistant, when the sudden tragedy had befallen the family. Unbowed, she was now determined to take the reins. Not for Lillian Charteris was the life of a pampered doll, albeit that her Papa’s substantial inheritance provided allowance for that choice.

"We must be strong, Grace! And Sylvie, do you really think our own Papa would have wished to see his beloved darlings so miserable?" The beautiful blonde eldest Charteris daughter leaned across to the twins and smiled gently. "He always taught us to live well, and take the rough with the smooth. Do you remember him saying that? When that arrangement he had set his heart on out in Philadelphia collapsed in tatters last Christmas, remember how he laughed it off and popped a bottle of the finest champagne, before dawn had even settled on Christmas morning?"

The twins giggled, and even Dorothea Charteris was forced to laugh quietly. Twenty-two blissful years of marriage, and three loyal daughters, were more than enough reward she had to admit to herself, for years of servitude in the background to her husband’s relentless work. And as Lillian had roundly pointed out to her on more than one occasion of late, reward had also come in the form of money. Breath taking amounts of money. They were one of the most affluent and respected families in New York State. No, reasoned Mrs. Charteris to herself, self-pity would not be the order of this, or any other day.

As the swish cab rattled on up Broadway in the shadow of the city’s tallest buildings and its bustling, oblivious hordes, Lillian fell silent and prepared for the afternoon ahead. There would be enforced small talk with the ghastly, artless cousins of Wisconsin? endless nosy questions from Aunt Belle and her entourage from White Plains? and as ever, constant snide remarks from Samuel Windus, the family lawyer. Her father’s biggest mistake, Lillian thought, had been retaining Windus for so long. She leaned back against the cab window as a cold, miserable rain began to fall. The grey sidewalks merged one into another as she became lost in her thoughts. Studying her own reflection, large blue, almond eyes and a fine Greek profile, she raged again inwardly at what Windus had said to her as they left the mansion that morning to say their last goodbyes to Papa.

Retaining her polished professionalism as always, Lillian had taken the opportunity to remind Sam Windus that she would be most grateful for his earliest attention to her father’s affairs, since business must be resumed as soon as possible.

"Of course, Miss Lillian," the thin-lipped lawyer had remarked, studying her apparel quite unashamedly. Even in deepest mourning, she looked radiant in a black gown of finest Parramatta silk, trimmed with crepe.

"You need have no fear whatsoever for your future. You do know that, Miss Lillian?"

"Of course I do, Mr. Windus. Papa worked hard to provide for us in life. So shall his enterprise do now that he is gone. And I shall see to it that his efforts are by no means short-lived. When I take control of the business myself."

At that Windus had grinned, eyebrows raised. "Really? That was not quite the spirit of my observation, Miss Lillian. What I meant in fact, is that with looks as ravishing as yours, you shall surely have no difficulty in finding a wealthy husband to keep you."

As Lillian glowered, he walked away before she could utter a word of argument. The lawyer had long tired of the first-born Charteris girl and her overly ambitious ways. Moreover, he had been frequently exasperated by her father’s constantly indulging her every wish and whim. Likewise, Lillian had tolerated Windus only because her father had insisted she did so.

"But Papa, he is so? so oily! He has a mean side to him we do not care for, Mama, the girls and I!"

Each time this kind of remark had been uttered, Alexander Charteris had raised a rare, scolding finger to his eldest daughter. "He is thorough at work, my dear. And besides, as you well know, his father, Justin Windus, was a dear friend of mine."

For all that she had adored her Papa, his softer side, and his tendency to see only the best in people often frustrated Lillian. Had he been harder she knew deep down, then his wealth and success could have increased tenfold. Now as the hansom cab drew up at the lavish townhouse, Lillian was already making plans to have Windus side lined, somehow. She would employ a solicitor with a more contemporary outlook. Times were changing, and she was fully intent on Charteris Holdings changing with them. It wouldn’t do to get stuck in old ways, and she knew for certain that none of the crusty old board members her father had insisted on retaining ‘approved’ of female employers. Well, we shall see to that thought Lillian as she breezed into the house, with Mama behind and the twins trotting either side of her. Taking her mother’s arm, Lillian knew that her mother shared her own slight nervousness at the thought of a future without Alexander Charteris. The house alone would be a full-time occupation in itself.

Charteris Mansion was a four-story brownstone townhouse off Broadway, on 92nd Street. It had a majestic portico, and the reception hall a fine rotunda with a stained-glass dome ceiling adapted from Italianate frescoes. In the hall, a long oak table graced the amber marble floor, every inch of it filled with china plates. There were cold cuts of partridge, boned quails in aspic, buffalo steak, oysters in b?chamel sauce, lamb cutlets saut?ed in port, lobster ? la king, timbales of shad roe, and green turtle soup. Confectionery of spun sugar and fruit ices set off the extravagant hospitality that Lillian had insisted upon. Her mother had fretted, saying that such a flamboyant display at Alexander’s funeral would set tongues wagging. But as Lillian now observed from the doorway, the gawping hordes that filled her father’s home had found far better use for their mouths, as one by one they filled their guest plates fit to topple. It did not surprise her in the least, and served to underline her poor view of the also-rans who had tried to bask in the glow of Charteris success.

Nodding approvingly to the maids standing obediently by, Lillian swept into the airy, deep-carpeted room. The mourners fell silent and turned to smile sadly at the Charteris widow, and her ravishing eldest daughter.

There were upwards of three dozen persons present. Lillian noted with a sniff that many had not seen or enquired about her father or the family for years. Already she had received several begging letters from long-lost relatives and former employees who had fallen on hard times. She planned to reply to each one, in no uncertain terms, once the will had been read, and she was installed as business manager. For now, she was prepared to tolerate the nosy and the greedy, if only to get rid of them once and for all thereafter.

"My dear Lillian!" said her overweight Uncle Walter as he rushed to embrace her. "How are you faring? Please, won’t you come up to White Plains and spend some time with your Aunt Belle and I? We miss you so!" he beamed broadly at Lillian, who returned the smile and allowed him to kiss her hand, but did not reply. Lillian knew that Uncle Walter was savoring the moment, in a house far grander than he could ever hope to occupy. He had always harbored jealousy of his younger brother-in-law.

"Holmes, fetch the ladies some tea," he continued as though he were master of the household.

"I shall have a sherry, Holmes," said Lillian, ignoring her fussy old Uncle and looking pointedly at the loyal butler. She noted with no little pleasure that the women within earshot looked aghast at her request.

"Lillian, my sweet thing," said Mama quietly as she sat down in the Macassar-covered fauteuil by the window. "Are you quite sure you ought to drink so, on an empty stomach?"

"Oh, Mama!" said Lillian, snatching a small sherry glass from the silver platter passed to her by Holmes,

"Papa would have wished for this to be a celebration of his life! And what a life it was!"

Swinging her thick, satin skirts round theatrically as she turned to face the people milling round the parlor, Lillian smiled a broad smile. Everyone wondered from where Lillian got her formidable spirit. And the twins knew too that she had been earmarked by their late father for a life of enterprise and adventure, whereas they were made to keep to their lessons, their piano practice, and embroidery.

"Friends, coworkers, dearest acquaintances," Lillian addressed the room. "My dear father’s life, although ended it far too soon, should serve as an example to us all. Work hard, live well, and treat one another kindly. To my father. To Alexander Charteris."

There was a murmur of approval from around the room and the hallway where a handful of mourners had strayed. Samuel Windus was fiercely irked by the girl’s demeanor, on this saddest of days. She was getting ideas far above her station, he thought with a grimace, as he observed her parade about the room, greeting people. He now dreaded the reading of the will. It was a little over a year since Alexander Charteris had passed to him the hand-written testimony, one day in a hurry as he dashed to a rendezvous in Midtown. He had muttered something about requiring to ‘add more detail.’ Despite the many attempts Windus had made at urging him to do so without delay, that deed had never been done. The matter had worried Windus day and night since Charteris’s passing. He puzzled over what changes his employer had intended.

Since Miss Lillian had become involved with the business, there was no knowing what influence she might have had. Windus prayed that her father had had the good sense to isolate the running of Charteris Inc. in his will, leaving the board members in control, with the Mansions and profits passing to Dorothea. No one would question the wisdom of such an instruction. But Windus knew that Alexander Charteris had always been a man in a hurry. The original will had been written a decade before?when the business was fledgling, and when there was still hope of an heir. It was a flimsy document. And so as things stood, Windus reasoned, there could well be an automatic passing of every brick and cent directly to the headstrong eldest?including the entire company. It was a thought that made him shudder.??????

As if reading his mind, Lillian sidled over Windus. Sherry glass aloft, she spoke in cool, conspiratorial tones.

"Mr. Windus. You and I have a busy few weeks ahead of us. My father’s affairs will require the most discreet handling, as I work out how best to move things forward."

Windus swallowed hard. The little madam hadn’t even let her father grow cold in his grave, and here she was issuing orders like a foreman. He felt his temper rise. "Yes indeed Miss Charteris," he replied grudgingly. "But we must all be aware that there may be many loose ends. Until the will is read, we cannot be at all certain of the future."

Lillian did not try to disguise her annoyance. "I cannot imagine what you mean. You are well aware that father had plans to have me installed at senior level within Charteris Inc. The last year has seen my input increase immeasurably. He was devoted to his family. Of which, I am the eldest. So I say we call it an open and shut case. Don’t you?"

The blonde beauty took another generous sip of sherry. Windus frowned. The little madam really knew no bounds. And it angered him most especially that she spoke the truth. Charteris had given her more and more free rein in recent months, while as hired lawyer, he was powerless to stop her.

"In that case, we must hasten the reading of the will. I shall instruct Deans at the office in Midtown to bring the original testimony here to the house first thing on Friday morning. Am I to assume you will be receiving?"

"Absolutely!" Lillian beamed falsely at the lawyer, who stood barely taller than her. "I shall tell Mama that the morning is to be given aside for the reading. Then after luncheon, you and I shall repair in order to draw up my first list of instructions. Thank you, Windus. You needn’t stay on this afternoon. If you have, well, other things to be getting along with?" With a pitying look and a raised eyebrow, she turned to go.

As the alluring blonde waltzed out of the parlor, her skirts swishing against the carpet, and her long golden blonde curls bobbing against the back of her tightly fitted bolero jacket, Windus screwed up his eyes in a mixture of rage and grudging admiration. Oh yes, he would very much like to ‘repair’ with her. But not to listen to any of her conceited ‘instructions.’ Who in hell did Lillian Charteris think she was?

No one could deny the girl had brains, almost as quick as a man’s. She had waltzed through her mathematical examinations in Boston. As well, she also had the finest looks of her generation, in all Manhattan Island. But goodness, Windus thought, as he studied the back of her skirt, that sweet wriggling bottom of hers sure could do with a sound spanking. How often over the years had he recoiled in frustration from bickering and tantrums in Charteris’s office, as the eldest had demanded to be party to all that her father did from day to day in the workplace. Every time, a soft nature had meant that the businessman invariably said yes. And how the haughty, ambitious Miss Lillian had thrived on it all. She had certainly acquired no few of the skills necessary in the boardroom. But there was a limit in Windus’s view?and that of most of his business associates across the city. The girl had demonstrated the need to be taken in hand on more than one occasion. If Alexander Charteris had failed in anything, Windus now thought, it was in that regard.

His mind raced now as he stood gawkily, empty glass in hand, gazing at the slim, blonde twenty year old now consorting with the elder male guests in the hallway, quite as though she already owned the place. He’d have given anything to haul her upstairs under his arm.

Chapter One

Manhattan, 1890

He imagined it clearly now. He’d fling her over the bed and raise that dress until it was about her ears. He could almost hear her pitiful howls of protest as he took her to task at last. Oh yes, he’d spank the seat of her drawers until she screamed so loud they’d hear her in the farthest, darkest drinking-dens of the Bowery. He’d use a martinet. No, perhaps a slipper. Or a hairbrush – yes! And he’d tan that beautiful shapely bottom until it glowed cherry red, and quietened her insolent mouth once and for all. Samuel Windus laughed softly to himself, imagining her outrage and the well-deserved humiliation it would bring. Then, despite a shameful misgiving in the home of his departed master, Windus could not stop himself from picturing what he might do next. Once her seat had been suitably warmed, perhaps it might be time to impress the lesson on her further by the swift removal of her drawers?.

As he watched her sidle gracefully across the room once more, Windus growled faintly deep in his throat. One day, he thought, you shall have your comeuppance.

* * * * *

It was after eight in the evening by the time the last of the guests departed. The twins were sent sleepily to their shared bedroom, while Lillian and her mother retired to the drawing-room for a cup of hot chocolate. Outside, the wintery rain had turned to sleet. The room seemed vast to them, alone now, and they quickly made for the cozy boudoir at its far corner. Its ceiling of white molded vine leaves cosseted them. The boudoir was spread with a cream colored carpet, and there were pretty ornaments of Bohemian glass all along the Parian mantelpiece. Lillian lay on the wide couch of crimson corded silk, overcome with relief that the awful day was over. After a few moments’ shared silence, she turned to her mother with a smile.

"It will be so very exciting, Mama. Taking Charteris Inc. into the twentieth century! Don’t you agree?" she asked, flush-faced.

Her mother glanced over at her rather disapprovingly. "I hope you have not had too much sherry, Lillian," she said in a tone that bored her eldest daughter. "It really is not seemly in a young lady."

"Oh, mother!" scoffed Lillian. "Must we? I am quite old enough to know my own mind. And you must shed these dated notions of what men do, and ladies oughtn’t. We are alone now, you see. There are no men in the Charteris line. It is all down to us, from this day on."

Dorothea could not argue. There were no sons, no nephews. She had stood by the sidelines quietly astonished, as Lillian made her mark on the business in the last year of her husband’s life. But could it really be that a twenty-year-old woman could stand at the helm of something so large and complicated to her mind at least? Over and above that, she worried about handling her three daughters all by herself. Lillian was headstrong enough, and Grace and Sylvie were following suit. Countless times in recent months, they had been sent to bed early for speaking back. Dorothea wondered if it might be best to introduce some changes to the household. What exactly, she did not yet know. But she knew deep down that a firmer hand would be necessary.

Lillian was oblivious. She would have given the world twice over to have her father back. But from loss, comes opportunity. That was what he had always told her, she recalled with love. Cup of chocolate in hand, she lay back on the couch. What the future held, who knew? But Lillian Charteris knew she’d be fully in charge of her own.

There was a quiet knock at the door.

"Yes?" said Dorothea.

Samuel Windus entered the room. Lillian grimaced slightly.

"Forgive me, please," he said nodding obsequiously to Dorothea.

"Might I be so bold as to request use of the cab? It is time I left you in peace."

"I thought you had already left, Mr. Windus?" said Lillian with an impudent tone that made her mother feel immediately apologetic.

"Samuel, please. Do not worry at all. Won’t you take one of the guest rooms? It is a foul evening. I am all too aware that you have an enormous workload ahead of you. The least I can do is take some of the strain?"

Windus could barely disguise his delight. While his salary allowed for a far from cheerless existence, his rooms in Midtown always looked so drab and uninviting after the splendor of Charteris Mansions?where today, the liquor flowed. And the family did owe him, the widow was right. His hours had been long of late, and he often felt taken for granted.

Lillian was deeply put out. Why should this jumped up hired hand be accommodated?

"Why thank you, Mrs. Charteris. That is dreadfully kind. It will save me a great deal of time in the morning. There are personal effects in the study, which I am afraid I shall have to ask you to identify, in advance of the reading. But I shall trouble you no longer."

"It is no trouble at all, Samuel," said the kindly Dorothea with a gracious smile. "Please tell Holmes of my instructions, and he will show you your room."

Windus was buoyed as he ascended the grand stairway to the second floor, Holmes a step ahead of him. He knew there was a bottle of Le Burguet ’65 in the late master’s bureau drawer. He’d have Holmes bring it up to him, why not? The fine brandy had been gifted to Charteris by the grateful chief of a construction firm, who had secured a sizeable amount of business from him. But Holmes needn’t know that. Windus would simply say it was a celebratory treat of some kind that the two men had intended to share. That he felt like a drink in his boss’s memory. He’d even offer the clumsy old duffer a small snoot, if he started chattering with questions.

As for the young Miss Lillian, he thought, as he undid his necktie, what a divine picture it made, being under the same rafters as that blonde piece overnight! It was enough to drive him to distraction, he admitted wickedly to himself, as he imagined her now undressing for bed. Still, the cognac would help in that regard. He was sorely tempted to pay a visit to her bedroom door and try and catch a glimpse of her through the keyhole. But no, he checked himself. It was hardly the dignified behavior of a man of the law, and would see him cast out if Dorothea were to catch him in the act. But it could be a lot worse, Windus old boy, he told himself. Even if he had to admire her shapely ass from a distance, at least he was keeping a closer watch on the delectable Miss Charteris. Something he knew was more necessary now, than ever.

16 reviews for Lillian Learns the Hard Way

  1. noangel

    Great story filled with romance and action The plot is well told and keep you turning the pages to see what will happen next

  2. noangel

    Great story filled with romance and action The plot is well told and keep you turning the pages to see what will happen next

  3. Meg

    Lillian Charteris has worked diligently learning her father\’s business, wanting desperately to help bring it into the modern world. At her father\’s death, she fully expects to take over the family holdings and is more than willing to work hard to provide for her mother and younger twin sisters. She receives quite a shock when her world is turned upside down and invaded by Johhny Gordons-Lamond. Who does he think he is traipsing into their lives and threatening to take her over his knee! She was indeed a very intelligent young woman but she was also headstrong and stubborn, traits that this interloper wouldn\’t put up with. Could a way be found to set aside differences to the benefit of not only their individual companies but for the two people who want nothing but the best – even if that does mean learning the hard way

  4. Meg

    Lillian Charteris has worked diligently learning her father’s business, wanting desperately to help bring it into the modern world. At her father’s death, she fully expects to take over the family holdings and is more than willing to work hard to provide for her mother and younger twin sisters. She receives quite a shock when her world is turned upside down and invaded by Johhny Gordons-Lamond. Who does he think he is traipsing into their lives and threatening to take her over his knee! She was indeed a very intelligent young woman but she was also headstrong and stubborn, traits that this interloper wouldn’t put up with. Could a way be found to set aside differences to the benefit of not only their individual companies but for the two people who want nothing but the best ??? even if that does mean learning the hard way

  5. SL

    4 stars
    Johnny and Lillian are brought together when Lillian’s father dies. Johnny has
    lost his family as well, but Lillian’s father has left his business to Johnny’s family.
    Lillian is a progressive woman who wants to be in charge of her father’s business,
    Sparks fly. Lillian has always gotten her way. Her father never raised a hand to
    her, and she is a brat. When she acts like a child, Johnny takes her in hand.

    There is a main story of the merger of the two companies and the budding romance. There is also a story of the lawyer that stole from Lillian’s father. Lillian has a lot of growing up to
    do as well as lessons to learn. There are some sexual scenes, but they are very mild. There
    are spankings with hand and hairbrush that are well deserved.

  6. SL

    4 stars
    Johnny and Lillian are brought together when Lillian??s father dies. Johnny has
    lost his family as well, but Lillian??s father has left his business to Johnny??s family.
    Lillian is a progressive woman who wants to be in charge of her father??s business,
    Sparks fly. Lillian has always gotten her way. Her father never raised a hand to
    her, and she is a brat. When she acts like a child, Johnny takes her in hand.

    There is a main story of the merger of the two companies and the budding romance. There is also a story of the lawyer that stole from Lillian??s father. Lillian has a lot of growing up to
    do as well as lessons to learn. There are some sexual scenes, but they are very mild. There
    are spankings with hand and hairbrush that are well deserved.

  7. Margaret Corcoran

    I loved this story. It is well written with complex human characters and some disciplinary spankings. There is a lot happening with twists and turns that keeps the reader interested. I highly recommend this story.

  8. Margaret Corcoran

    I loved this story. It is well written with complex human characters and some disciplinary spankings. There is a lot happening with twists and turns that keeps the reader interested. I highly recommend this story.

  9. JK

    Great story with a loveable brat and an alpha male ready to take her in hand! There is a lot to like about this one: even though it is not a long story, it has plenty of detail to keep you interested and involved. I loved the 2 main characters (and all their interactions), along with the twin sisters, the mother and a little bit of intrigue!! Too good to miss!

  10. JK

    Great story with a loveable brat and an alpha male ready to take her in hand! There is a lot to like about this one: even though it is not a long story, it has plenty of detail to keep you interested and involved. I loved the 2 main characters (and all their interactions), along with the twin sisters, the mother and a little bit of intrigue!! Too good to miss!

  11. Redrabbitt

    I enjoyed this historical story that takes place in Manhattan, NY in 1890. The plot kept me captivated and the pages turning. So many emotions from grief shock and sadness to heartbreak, back to shock, to anger, and having to learn to deal with the unexpected outcome of an outdated will. Good intentions of making changes, but never coming to fruitarian, proves frustrating but in the end, turns out to be a blessing in disguise. Lillian Charteris, oldest daughter of Alexander Charteris, has worked with her father and has a good head on her shoulders when it came to business, she is sharp with numbers and has compassion for those less fortunate, as her father did. Johnny Gordons-Lamond has great business sense and has multiple the family business. What a surprise to learn that he has now inherited Charteris, Inc. But more shock comes when he must deal with Lillian and her tantrums. Amazing what upending her over his knee and using her own hairbrush can do to adjust her belligerent attitude. There are several spanking scenes, the sex scenes are mild. The story has an interesting cast of characters with entertaining dialog, elements of mystery and suspense and an HEA ending.

  12. Redrabbitt

    I enjoyed this historical story that takes place in Manhattan, NY in 1890. The plot kept me captivated and the pages turning. So many emotions from grief shock and sadness to heartbreak, back to shock, to anger, and having to learn to deal with the unexpected outcome of an outdated will. Good intentions of making changes, but never coming to fruitarian, proves frustrating but in the end, turns out to be a blessing in disguise. Lillian Charteris, oldest daughter of Alexander Charteris, has worked with her father and has a good head on her shoulders when it came to business, she is sharp with numbers and has compassion for those less fortunate, as her father did. Johnny Gordons-Lamond has great business sense and has multiple the family business. What a surprise to learn that he has now inherited Charteris, Inc. But more shock comes when he must deal with Lillian and her tantrums. Amazing what upending her over his knee and using her own hairbrush can do to adjust her belligerent attitude. There are several spanking scenes, the sex scenes are mild. The story has an interesting cast of characters with entertaining dialog, elements of mystery and suspense and an HEA ending.

  13. Juliette

    This is a short book that packs an awful lot into 47,000 words. It is set in the late 19th century in an era where women are starting to seriously strive for gender equality. Lillian and Johnny meet head to head when Lillian loses what she feels is rightly hers, when her father dies and leaves the family business to Johnny. Lillian strongly objects of course and Johnny deals with her by taking her in hand. This book is well written with some interesting twists and turns in the plot. I enjoyed it very much.

  14. Juliette

    This is a short book that packs an awful lot into 47,000 words. It is set in the late 19th century in an era where women are starting to seriously strive for gender equality. Lillian and Johnny meet head to head when Lillian loses what she feels is rightly hers, when her father dies and leaves the family business to Johnny. Lillian strongly objects of course and Johnny deals with her by taking her in hand. This book is well written with some interesting twists and turns in the plot. I enjoyed it very much.

  15. Denise (verified owner)

    I felt for Lillian a lot. It must have been so hard to lose her father and a company you discover she loves to someone she doesn\’t know, all because she is a woman. I didn\’t not feel that she was a brat. She shouldn\’t have said the things she did nor throw the figurine, but she did have a right to be upset. There was no reading of why the people in the household thought she should be punished. She was acting the way she thought she should. Her mother didn\’t seem to be able to handle the business end, so why shouldn\’t the daughter who was with her father all the time. I don\’t know how believable it was for them to have sex in that day and age before marriage or even speaking of marriage. I also thought she took things very well, considering.

  16. Denise (verified owner)

    I felt for Lillian a lot. It must have been so hard to lose her father and a company you discover she loves to someone she doesn’t know, all because she is a woman. I didn’t not feel that she was a brat. She shouldn’t have said the things she did nor throw the figurine, but she did have a right to be upset. There was no reading of why the people in the household thought she should be punished. She was acting the way she thought she should. Her mother didn’t seem to be able to handle the business end, so why shouldn’t the daughter who was with her father all the time. I don’t know how believable it was for them to have sex in that day and age before marriage or even speaking of marriage. I also thought she took things very well, considering.

Add a review